Saturday, August 28, 2010

Wish You Were Here--Debra

Wish You Were Here

42 x 44 inches
variety of fabrics, raw edge sewn, embroquilting, buttons






Two of the elements of the photograph that appealed to me were the windows and the texture.  I decided to explore/experiment with those in the comstruction of this piece.  I'm not crazy about a neutral color scheme even though in my head I always think I would like to work on one.  But, what I did enjoy was playing with the fabrics in their original states.  I did as little as possible to change them when I added them to the composition.  I wanted to honor the journey these fabrics had taken to get to this point.  There actually are some fabrics in here that I have had for a very long time -- waiting for their 15 minutes of fame.

Once I got to the end of the work, I began to think that this piece needs to continue as a handwork project with more textures developed.  Whether that happens or not, I don't know but I don't feel like it is completely done yet.  It does follow in the footsteps of other pieces I have posted for this challenge and it gave me another opportunity to experiment with quilting on the embroidery machine.




10 comments:

  1. I love texture and unraveling and the celebration of fabric that this piece oozes. You did a subtle representation of the elements in the photo which I enjoyed spotting as I traveled across the the surface. The contrast of the straightline quilting against the looseness of the fabric edge
    was perfect.

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  2. really like keeping the fabric at its basic truth. Loads of texture here! I see the photos elements throughout the piece, what fun!! Like this. A very interesting work! I can understand your wanting to take it further with some hand stitching, either way it looks good!

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  3. Congratulations on such an individual interpretation! I like the way you've used the fabric as is to suggest the elements of the photo, especially the windows. The quilting in the water section suggests a reflection so cleverly too.

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  4. I really wanted to show that the area of those buildings we were interpreting had some age, roughness, irregularity & kind of a soft aged patina too. When I started pulling out fabrics the ones with the "history" of already being distressed or the parts that we would normally cut off (like that middle piece is where 2 fabrics were joined at the factory) seemed most appropriate to use.

    It really looks more interesting in person. I think it is the kind of piece that grows on you. At first glance it is pretty chaotic but then (at least for me) it becomes rather mellow.

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  5. You've really represented the shapes and lines of the photo, in addition to the aged look. The palette and lines look very different from your past pieces, yet there are similarities also. I love the touch the buttons add!

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  6. It always amazes me how you can take what to my eye is a cacophany of fabric, put it together in your particular style, and have it look so representive of the inspiration piece. In this case, it's the textures that grab you. Well done once again.

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  7. I love this. The elements of the photo are all there...and with such feeling. Having recently returned from Europe, I still can conjure the physical feeling of the closeness of the buildings, the life, past and present, that fairly teems in the tiny, twisty streets and the ancient buildings, the patina of age present everywhere. I loved the photo prompt, though I imagined that it would be difficult to interpret because there was just so much that could be done with it, that it would be a challenge to settle on just one idea. This piece does, indeed capture all that the photo evokes. I love the rawness as well as the softness that the fabrics in their original states portray. The texture here is amazing. Well done!

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  8. The extraction of some of those elements was the right way to go and certainly fits your style. Your pieces are always identifiable as yours so good news there. Keep going in this style:)

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  9. I saw this and immediately thought "collage architecture" - all the elements are there and once again it feels like you really enjoyed creating this piece. I agree with Quiltnbee - well said and Debra, well done!

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  10. This is an interesting abstraction of the shapes within the photo that portrays the crowding of the buildings and their age. Well done!

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Thanks for stopping by and commenting!