Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Shifting Sands- Beverly

Shifting Sands
20" X 31"
Commercial and hand dyed cottons, hand dyed cheesecloth, embroidery thread, beads

Going through several versions of the challenge is becoming a pattern for me.  I started out planning to do something like Nellie's scrapwork. I dyed cheesecloth and scrim. I had the sketch, the fabrics picked out- and it just wasn't working for me.  The more I thought about it, the less I wanted to work with all the photo elements.  I kept coming back to- dirt.  All that dirt in the photo, and all the different soils in all the places I've lived in my life.
So, I raided the stash and went for everything I had that could remotely be construed as dirt, with a wide range of values.  I strip pieced it, then cut it vertically and offset the ends.  I see the colors of the desert sands, the rich soil of the Midwest, the green and brown moist soil of Florida.

I studied the layers for a few days on my design wall, and  I decided that it couldn't stand alone. I needed some 'messy' elements- after all, this is dirt!   So I constructed a quilted 'mat' and hand stitched the strip sections to it, with pieces of the dyed cheesecloth sticking out the edges.  There's also strips of cheesecloth winding its way across the strip along with irregular beads.


I will admit to having mixed feelings about this one. I like how the colors play together, but I'm not sure I achieved the feeling of texture I was going for. I think I probably went to quickly to my comfort zone, which I'm beginning to figure out is freeform strip piecing.  But there you have it- Shifting Sands.

11 comments:

  1. I do love the way you are not confined by the square!

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  2. Without knowing what mental picture you actually saw in your head, I do think you got a lot of texture. The title of "Shifting Sands" is a good one also. There are some less flowing elements to go with the elements that have more movement. It is almost like you took a slice of the hillside and placed it in a larger context. I love every much too that you personalized the piece. You chose to represent the soils of all of the places that you have lived; essentially taking someone else's photo and making it your own. Well done!

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  3. I like the way you focused on the part of the photo that spoke to you. What you've done is use your technique of strip piecing along with a unique take on the photo, but it still resembles the original. Good job.

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  4. I like to think of interpreting the challenge photos for this group in terms of music ... the melody is recognizable, but has the stamp of each individual performing it. This one feels like jazz with a strong bass fiddle. You've presented the main elements in this piece ... even the water in the flowing lines of quilting ... in a uniquely wonderful and personal way. Kudos!

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  5. You stayed true to yourself and your style in this one and I respect that. I love the fabric choices and how you carried the quilt lines into the background, adding the circles to it for added texture. Good work!

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  6. All that is missing are some rubber worms! The earth is so big and so personal at the same time to all of us. I particularly like that you claimed your piece of earth and interpreted it. I really like this piece and I especially like the 3D feel to it. Super!

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  7. great job! love the cheese cloth and your fabrics

    xo

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  8. Nellie, I love the analogy of music for this group. I'll be wondering during the process what music I'm creating- or, better yet, what my favorite rock and roll would look like.

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  9. I do like the free form shape of this! Love the texture of the bits that overhang here and there. I think this one is very successfull!!

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  10. Beautiful, beautiful! I love the way the layers float on the background. Excellent interpretation!

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  11. Wonderful interpretation! I think the quilted mat and cheese cloth perfectly compliment the central striped offset piece.

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