Saturday, February 27, 2010

Takeout for Two--Beverly

 
Beverly Hart, February 2010- 15 3/4" by 27 1/2"
 Commercial cottons, pieced and fused applique, metallic paint, painted chopsticks, machine quilting
Like several others, I was first drawn by the lines, shapes and colors in Rian's photograph.  I played with those for a bit.  The thought of a lone diner was too much for me- think of the Three Dog Night song "One" running through my mind.  Rian may have had one dinner in the photo, but I know she wasn't dining alone.  So I flipped the pattern I'd developed, and this is what I came up with.

I also toyed with the idea of making the vegetables and noodles on the plates, but quickly gave up that idea.  The Chinese letters are about gratitude and thankfulness for the food that nourishes us- or at least that is what the site I found said!!  The colors in the print are the same as the colors in the food.  Making those letters was a real challenge.  I cut them out of the print, fused them to black fabric, and cut those out so I had a small outline of the letters.  My fabric kept giving me fits, it was about the most ravely fabric I've used in a long time.

 

There have been times in this process when I've looked at the piece and wondered "Where did this come from?"  Certainly the colors and simple shapes are reminiscent of other work I've done, but it's been a long time since I've made a quilt with all commercial fabric.  It also feels much more formal than past work.  That being said, I thoroughly enjoyed the process.  I'm especially happy I figured out how to use real chopsticks in it!  And I'm pleased with how the quilting designs add to the formal feel of the quilt.


 
I'll post this on my personal blog tomorrow, critiques are welcome.  And can I just say I hope I never run this close to the deadline again?  I put the paint on the corners and stuck it on my design wall two hours before my reveal time.  Too close for comfort!!

10 comments:

  1. Stunning! What I particularly like is the way you kept do many elements of the original but strengthened the oriental opulence of it. What a clever way to handle the problem of the food, too. Glad you finished, and lets hope all of us aren't so close to the deadline next month.

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  2. Fabulous interpretation! Each fabric fills its roll wonderfully well. The two different quilting patterns are intriguing. Is the background one a Chinese coin pattern? How did you get the plates are so very round with smooth edges? Reverse applique?

    I'd like to be sitting at this table.

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  3. This has such richness to it. And yes, the plates are so round and smooth!!! How?? I love the Chinese charecters in place of the food. Great job!

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  4. What a wonderful interpretation. The Chinese characters in place of the food is a wonderful idea. Great background quilting, also. And are those real chopsticks I see? I do believe they are! I like the idea of the two plates, so much more interesting than just one, and makes the piece a more pleasing long banner shape. Applause!!

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  5. The circles are done with Sharon Schamber's piecelique technique, a foolproof way t piece curves and circles. The quilting design behind the plates is one from Charlotte Warr Anderson's last book, One Stitch at a Time- I think she called it Facets. I learned some great patterns, and easy ways to make them, from her.

    And, thanks to all for the feedback!

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  6. Beverly, your piece has a very romantic connected feeling to me--as though two lovers are reaching across the table to touch each other's hand.

    The background quilting has a wonderful sashiko look to it -- a nice contrast to the diagonal quilting on the plate that looks very english (or western world?) to me.

    A very, very well done piece!

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  7. I love the elegance you captured in this piece with clean lines and bold colors. Lovely! I particularly like the quilting behind the plates.

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  8. Beautiful work on the quilting and I especially love the way you found the right Kanji and cut it to use for the food. Nice that it's a meal for two as well. That does make it a bit romantic and I love the sashiko.

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  9. Bright and Bold! I love the dinner for two concept and how clever to just flip the pattern. Definitely gives the oriental feel to the viewer.
    Bravo!

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  10. I love that you flipped the piece and created a meal for two. The whole work looks very elegant. The letters are an extremely nice touch; very meaningful when all things are considered.

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