Tuesday, January 5, 2010

What Picture to Choose? --Debra

When it comes to the needlearts, I fear they will disappear from women's lives if they are not passed on to another (younger) generation by us older more experienced sewers. Sewing has been my life; it has moved me through every stage of my life with projects befitting the events at the time. As I reflect back through my history I cannot imagine how it would have played out without sewing.

As I looked through the various pictures I thought appropriate for this challenge, I remembered one of me with my maternal Grandmother. While I didn't have a long relationship with my grandmother, I do remember her sewing and the notions she pulled out to use. So using that picture, I am busily composing my piece for this month's challenge. It's a glimpse back to the beginning.

How about you? How did you decide on your picture? Was there someone in your life who was determined to see that you learned to sew? Who was it? and what did you learn from her?

Everyone is welcome to comment!

8 comments:

  1. My mother had six sisters, all of whom lived on the same street and all of whom sewed, quilted, crocheted, embroidered. They were taught by their mother, any my mother, Aunt Gladys and Aunt Mae all had a hand in teaching me the basics. We had an old Kenmore sewing machine, and that's what I learned to sew on. I made my first dress at 13 I believe. My mother was good with sleeves; my aunt Gladys was good with zippers; my Aunt Mae was good at helping me figure out the directions - and telling me everything I made was wonderful! Mae taught me to crochet. Later, I picked up other fiber crafts on my own, but they planted the seed - primarily because they were always doing some type of needlework, and when I wanted to try, they encouraged me. They are all gone now - I can't tell you how much I miss them!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think it would be interesting to know how many of us learned to sew or do other needlework from a relative. It's probably the easiest way to connect with a hobby when you see your mom or aunt or grandmother doing it. I had an aunt who made quilts that looked like Gee's Bend quilts. In my family we didn't have "heirloom" quilts. We had whatever big pieces of fabric could be sewn together and tied with yarn (and some kind of lumpy batting).

    ReplyDelete
  3. I chose my picture cuz it was pretty. I learned sewing from my grandma, on a treadle machine. I sewed clothes for my dollies. Never saw a quilt until 1997. We had afghans. Crocheted afghans.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I learned to sew in 4-H, but my mother was the leader at least part of the time, so she taught me too. Both she and my grandmother taught me how to quilt. None of this has anything to do with the picture I chose though; I don't have any pictures from that time of my life.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I too, learned to sew from my mother. My Grandmother taught her. The embroidery came about from experimentations though my grandmother was an excellent stitcher and seamstress. Unfortunately I have no photos of us together.

    ReplyDelete
  6. My first experience with embroidery was in a children's home. The "Mother" took note of my curiosity about what she was doing and got me started with the outline stitch on tea towels. Later on I learned sewing skills through 4-H and home economics. My interest in stitching has never waned.

    As an adult I reconnected with my mother and discovered that many women in her/our family avidly embroidered, sewed, and quilted. When I sit and stitch for awhile I feel a sense of connection ... a sense of belonging.

    ReplyDelete
  7. http://www.ctpubblog.com/2010/01/04/self-portrait-my-personal-history-of-fashion/

    I'm not quite sure where to put this link but I thought you might like a look -- about self portraits!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow Debra, thanks for that link! What an amazing idea for a self portrait!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by and commenting!