Monday, January 11, 2010

Kay--Technical Advice

Since it's ok to get input while work is progress, I have a quick question. It doesn't even require a picture, so you don't need to go to Flickr. Here it is: Did anyone ever hand quilt over nylon net/tulle? I put net over my portrait because I have unstitched applique. I intended to machine quilt, but have decided to do simple hand quilting instead. After two rows of hand quilting the effect is unattractively puckered. The back is not puckered, but just quilted looking, so I'm blaming the net. Does anyone know anything about this? I can remove the net at this stage, but before I do, I thought I'd check. Thanks. I think I'll put this on my regular blog too, but thought I'd check here first.

11 comments:

  1. I have not quilted the tulle but I have hand embroidered over it without any problem. I wonder if you take longer stitches if that would solve the problem? I know, I know, we LIKE to take tiny stitches.

    Let me know the results please! I had considered doing the same thing and may still if my current technique goes down hill.

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  2. That is a Nellie-style question or Karen perhaps. Nellie for sure though.

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  3. I don't know the answer, Kay but I do like the sound of Judith's suggestion.

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  4. This is definately one for Nellie! The only tulle I used was scrunched up on purpose so that is NO help!!

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  5. I won't be any help either, I have never hand quilted anything! I agree, if anyone would know, it's Nellie--

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  6. The only time I ever worked with it (tulle), I sewed it down into the sashing before machine quilting. I would imagine that whether by hand or machine, you still want it as flat as possible before quilting so you avoid that undesirable effect. I wonder if although it is tulle you could lightly spray baste it into place before quilting...

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  7. Kay, I have fused tulle on top and sewn through it successfully. You must use a very light fuse--I use Wonder Under because that's what I have, but I have heard Misty Fuse is be very good. Hope this helps.

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  8. I appreciate everyone's suggestions. What I've done so far was remove the quilting stitches, re-pin to make sure the layers were tight, and try again, being very careful not to pull the stitches very tight. This seems to look better. So this may have been operator error, caused by pulling tight to pop the knot. Using a hoop, at least for the longest seams, might be helpful too.

    The tulle is currently stitched into the seam connecting the main part to the border, so I can't fuse or spray. If this doesn't work, I will have to carefully cut the tulle away and just let those fused appliques lie there naked. I'm sure they'd be fine anyway.

    Judith, I hope this discussion is helpful to you too.

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  9. I certainly think this is beneficial to all of us. This is exactly how I hoped this group would be able to work together to solve design problems.

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  10. Don't be afraid to go "naked" with your appliques! But I caution you, once you have felt that liberated, you may be unable to turn back to the tedious task of satin stitching or blanket stitching or needle turning, etc.! I do all my appliques raw edge and then just quilt along the edges. The only exception would be if it's for a bed quilt. Otherwise, fuse and forget about it!

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  11. Coming to your question from the view point of a hand embroiderer,I'd suggest placing your "piece" in a lipped hoop to keep all layers firmly positioned for your hand quilting.It's worked for me with both bridal tulle and l/w organza/organdy.
    Another point to consider is that your tulle is STRAIGHT and not cut or positioned on the cross weave.

    Misty fuse works well under tulle also.

    My two bits worth! Will watch comments with interest.

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